U.S. Foundation Seeks Global Partner To Develop 3D-printed Prosthetic Hands

- Aug 30, 2018-

Jon Schull, founder of e-NABLE, presents a 3D-printed prosthetic hand in New York, the United States, Nov. 5, 2015.

Jon Schull, founder of e-NABLE, presents a 3D-printed prosthetic hand in New York, the United States, Nov. 5, 2015. E-NABLE, a global network of volunteers who are using 3-D printers, is targeted at creating free 3D-printed prosthetic hands for those in need. The U.S. foundation was seeking global partners to develop 3D-printed prosthetic hands for children missing fingers or hands. 

NEW YORK, Nov. 5-- A U.S. foundation was seeking global partners to develop 3D-printed prosthetic hands for children missing fingers or hands.

e-NABLE, a global network of volunteers who are using 3-D printers, is targeted at creating free 3D-printed prosthetic hands for those in need.

"We're looking for partners in developing countries around the world who can help us assure the medical safety of our subjects," Jon Schull, founder of the foundation, told reporters Wednesday.

Traditional prostheses are too expensive -- they can cost thousands of dollars per year -- or impractical because children outgrow them, he said.

E-NABLE's website provides a hub for anyone, from design engineers and 3D print enthusiasts to those seeking a prosthetic limb for themselves, or someone else.

According to e-NABLE's estimate, the cost of materials of the Raptor Hand they make is approximately 35 U.S. dollars. In contrast, a professionally made, muscle-actuated hand can cost around 6,000 to 10,000 dollars.

Schull mentioned that Google.org has awarded a 600,000-dollar grant to the foundation to further advance e-NABLE's innovative work on 3D-printed open-source prosthetics.


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